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129 Results for 'SSL'
Blog

By Entrust Datacard

April 14, 2014

With news of the Heartbleed bug, Entrust has been receiving questions as to how this impacts the certification authority (CA) service at Entrust. In summary, Entrust SSL customers do not need to be concerned about the management of their certificates or their certificate management accounts. The CA private keys are protected on a NIST FIPS 140-2 Level 3 hardware security module (HSM).
Blog

By Bruce Morton

March 06, 2017

Entrust Datacard’s monthly SSL review covers SSL/TLS discussions — recaps news, trends and opinions from the industry.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

August 23, 2017

The Entrust Datacard monthly SSL review covers SSL/TLS discussions — recaps news, trends and opinions from the industry.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

March 19, 2013

The team of Nadhem AlFardan, Dan Bernstein, Kenny Paterson, Bertram Poettering and Jacob Schuldt published an RC4 encryption attack in SSL/TLS. As Matthew Green says, RC4 is old and crummy.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

January 17, 2013

Yahoo is jumping on the SSL bandwagon to help secure their users’ email.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

May 22, 2017

Entrust Datacard’s monthly SSL review covers SSL/TLS discussions — recaps news, trends and opinions from the industry.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

February 21, 2013

Over the years, publicly-trusted CAs have issued SSL certificates with domain names of different types. The most common is the Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN). This is a certificate that has been issued with a name registered with an entity that manages a top-level domain (TLD), for example server1.domain.com. The differentiating characteristic about an FQDN is that it is unique. There is one controller of domain.com and that controller determines who can have any name under that root, such as server1.domain.com.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

May 01, 2011

Throughout this blog I appear to use (or misuse) the terms SSL, TLS and HTTPS interchangeably. From time to time I catch myself and say, “Which one should I be using?” Frankly, my default is to use SSL. When I reference an article or site, I do tend to side with the term it prefers. So what’s the difference?
Blog

By Bruce Morton

February 27, 2013

The CA/Browser Forum SSL Baseline Requirements have been endorsed by Mozilla and have been included in their certificate authority (CA) certificate policy.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

July 08, 2014

Entrust’s monthly SSL review discussions — and likely other digital certificates — recaps news, trends and opinions from the industry. Entrust and CA Security Council Entrust Identity ON, July 2014.
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