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18 Results for 'Chrome'
Blog

By Bruce Morton

January 27, 2015

When Google Chrome 41 is released, it will treat certificate chains using SHA-1 which are valid past January 1, 2017 as affirmatively insecure.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

March 09, 2018

In Chrome 68, which will be released in July 2018, we can expect "Not secure" to be provided for all HTTP pages.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

March 13, 2015

Chrome 41 was released on March 3, 2015. You may have noticed, Chrome 41 did not have a change to treat certificate chains using SHA-1 valid past January 1, 2017 to be affirmatively insecure.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

September 09, 2016

Google will soon be issuing a stronger warning to visitors who navigate to a website that does not have the protection of an SSL/TLS certificate. With the release of Chrome 53 on Windows, Google has changed the trust indications to introduce the circle-i. 
Blog

By Bruce Morton

August 31, 2016

Google is making security icon changes in the Chrome status bar. The changes are based on a research paper prepared by members of Google and University of California, Berkeley. The research evaluated forty icons, seven complementary strings and surveyed 1,329 people. 
Blog

By Bruce Morton

October 17, 2013

Entrust completed an internal test recently and was surprised by a warning from Google Chrome version 30. The test case has a Web server with a non-fully registered domain name (non-FQDN) and an SSL certificate from a publicly trusted certification authority (CA).
Blog

By Bruce Morton

September 10, 2014

Entrust Datacard shares announcement from Google on September 5, 2014, that Chrome will sunset SHA-1 by providing security warnings through the popular browser. SHA-1 is a secure hash algorithm used when signing SSL certificates. SHA-1 provides a unique 160-bit hash value representing the certificate. The hash value is designed so it cannot be the same for two different certificates.
Blog

By Diana Gruhn

February 27, 2018

The Point of No Return for HTTPS Arrives in the Google Chrome 68 Release Expected in July 2018.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

February 22, 2018

As of April 1, 2018, CAs can only issue SSL/TLS certificates with a maximum validity period of 825-days (~27 months). 
Blog

By Diana Gruhn

June 26, 2018

Apple will join leading browser Google Chrome in enforcing a Certificate Transparency policy for all public SSL/TLS certificates issued after October 15, 2018. Websites that have certificates that are out of compliance risk their users encountering trust errors.
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