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11 Results for 'Certification Authority'
Blog

By Entrust Datacard

September 05, 2017

Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) is a method for a domain owner to permit one or more certification authorities (CAs) to issue SSL/TLS certificates using their domain name.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

January 17, 2017

Vulnerabilities, Requirements for Code Signing Certificate, Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) Standards
Blog

By Entrust Datacard

January 21, 2013

In 2011, Google added public key pinning to Chrome. They white-listed the certification authority public keys that could be used to secure Google domains.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

January 07, 2019

Entrust Datacard has a Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) page to provide information on CAA, including a CAA Best Practices guide to support DNS administrators.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

March 16, 2017

Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) allows a domain owner to specify in their DNS or DNSSec which Certification Authority (CA) is authorized to issue certificates to their domain. The new CAA policy has now been defined by the CA/Browser forum and is scheduled to take effect September 8, 2017. CAA may be the best way to protect domain owners from having fraudulent certificates issued in their domain name. This has become increasingly important with the proliferation of unauthorized DV certificates.
Blog

By Stephen Demone

October 04, 2016

When it comes time to purchase your SSL/TLS certificate, you will be presented with a number of different choices with seemingly very little differences between them. But just like anything, being able to discern the differences between Certification Authorities (CAs) means taking the time to do some research. 
Blog

By Bruce Morton

April 04, 2013

We’ve heard the argument that website operators could just use self-sign certificates. They are easy to issue and they are “free.” Before issuing self-signed certificates, it’s a good idea to examine the trust and security model. You should also compare self-signed certificates to the publicly trusted certification authority (CA) model; and then make your own decision.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

September 19, 2013

Watchers of the SSL industry follow SSL protocol attacks such as BEAST, CRIME, Lucky 13 and RC4 closely. They also track the rare certification authority (CA) attacks such as Comodo or DigiNotar. But they don’t seem to spend much time following attacks to the domain name registration system (DNS).
Blog

By Bruce Morton

September 06, 2013

Public Key Pinning was great idea at first. Google used static public keys to protect their websites. In doing so, the keys were embedded in Chrome and were useful in helping users find the DigiNotar attack in 2011, and in a mistaken certification authority (CA) certificate issued by TURKTRUST in 2012.
Blog

By Bruce Morton

October 17, 2013

Entrust completed an internal test recently and was surprised by a warning from Google Chrome version 30. The test case has a Web server with a non-fully registered domain name (non-FQDN) and an SSL certificate from a publicly trusted certification authority (CA).
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